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As you may guess from the name it is a triploid daughter of Perle. “Triploids are a good way of getting more positive characteristics from the parents while avoiding the negative ones” said Scott Dorsch. Triploids also have the benefit of producing heavier cones and lower seed production even in high seed years. This hop was released by the USDA-ARS in late 2013. Its aroma is described as mellow and pleasant, reflecting citrus (orange, rind/zest), melon, resin, pepper, and spicy notes. The beer carried some spice and citrus but was an earthier spice than Tahoma. It will be tough to get a hold of this one in any quantity for a while as well.

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This green bine cultivar (W-421-38) was released in May 1985 in Washington State and Idaho from a cross between a Petham Golding and a USDA-selected male (63012M). Slightly spicy and very piney. Its alpha acid content ranges from 12 to 14%. Substitutes for bittering: Eroica, Galena, Nugget. Substitutes for aroma and flavor: Southern Cross, Sticklebract.

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Released by Washington State University in 2013, this hop is a direct daughter of Cascade. Though closely related to Cascade it has many unique flavor and aroma characteristics. Brynildson said “I get coconut on the rub, I don’t find coconut in hops very often.” Its aroma is described as having strong melon, fruity (lemon, lime peel, pineapple), coconut, and spicy notes. Cashmere contains more alpha acid than Cascade, twice as much humulene, and no farnesene. The beer was nice and smooth and had a wonderful nose and aftertaste. This will be a hop to watch for as production ramps up. There is very limited availability right now.

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