Hops

  • Showing 1–12 of 19 results

Compare
$10.00

AlphAroma was bred at the Riwaka Research Station in New Zealand. It is a tirploid variety as a cross between Smooth Cone X Open Pollination. It was released in 1983, although it was originally bred in the late 1970’s. If AlphAroma Hops is still grown today, its hard to find it commercially.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Cascade Hops aroma and flavor is best summed up, as simply, American Pale Ale. There is also New Zealand as well as Argentinean Cascade. This particular variety took life in 1972 and has certainly won some hearts in the brewing industry. Bread by the U.S.D.A in Oregon, Cascade Hops can be found overwhelmingly in a number of commercial U.S. beers.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Released by Washington State University in 2013, this hop is a direct daughter of Cascade. Though closely related to Cascade it has many unique flavor and aroma characteristics. Brynildson said “I get coconut on the rub, I don’t find coconut in hops very often.” Its aroma is described as having strong melon, fruity (lemon, lime peel, pineapple), coconut, and spicy notes. Cashmere contains more alpha acid than Cascade, twice as much humulene, and no farnesene. The beer was nice and smooth and had a wonderful nose and aftertaste. This will be a hop to watch for as production ramps up. There is very limited availability right now.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Centennial Hops is a celebration of the gods in a medium compact cone form. Named after the Washington State festival sharing the same name, this variety was another brain child of the USDA. Once again, Brewer’s Gold Hops was used along with Fuggle, East Kent Golding, Bavarian, and one other unknown variety to produce this dark yello lupulin producer.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

This green bine cultivar (W-421-38) was released in May 1985 in Washington State and Idaho from a cross between a Petham Golding and a USDA-selected male (63012M). Slightly spicy and very piney. Its alpha acid content ranges from 12 to 14%. Substitutes for bittering: Eroica, Galena, Nugget. Substitutes for aroma and flavor: Southern Cross, Sticklebract.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Originated from mass selection of the Cluster hop, which is an old American cultivar. It is suggested that they arose from hybridization of varieties, imported by Dutch and English settlers and indigenous male hops. A late ripening Cluster cultivar. Also known as Golden Cluster. They can give a black currant aroma/flavor. Substitutes: Brewer’s Gold.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Glacier Hops is a balanced dual purpose hops. Its composure lends itself to many applications in many styles of beers. Glacier’s alpha acid rating averages around 5.5% and its flavor and aroma profile are suitable for both English and American style ales. It contains moderate humulene, myrcene, and caryophyllene oils, all in good balance. The aroma has citrus notes, and hints of fruit, as well as an herby and woody aroma. The bitterness is active and satisfying.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Originally cultivated in Oregon. Mount Rainier has a complex parentage, including Hallertau, Galena, Fuggles and other hops, and exhibits some noble hop characteristics, but is higher in alpha acid. The aroma is reminiscent of licorice with a hint of citrus.

Compare
Compare
$10.00

Nugget Hops was released in 1982 by the U.S.D.A and is a cross between Brewers Gold and a high alpha acid male. Nugget Hops is the mother of Millenium Hops and ranks second for amount grown Oregon and by 1991 had taken over 14.1% of U.S. hop production

Compare
1 2